FREE Poetry Contests with Prizes from $50 to $500! DEADLINES in August 2015

augcontest

 

All four contests below have no entry fees and are listed in order of earliest deadlines in August 2015.

Blue Earth Review

DEADLINE: 8/14/2015

SUBMISSION FEE: NONE

NOTES: “Founded in 2003, Blue Earth Review is the official literary magazine of Minnesota State University, Mankato. The magazine publishes annually, and its editors are always seeking quality submissions of poetry, prose, and art.”

FORMS: Poetry

PRIZE(S): $500

DUOTROPE: https://duotrope.com/listing/1444

The Lost Country

DEADLINE: 8/15/2015

SUBMISSION FEE: NONE

NOTES: “The Lost Country is a biannual literary journal published by the Exiles Club of Fort Worth. Have a poem, short story, or translation you would like us to publish? What about a critical essay or book review? Our editors are always on the lookout for fresh works from new literary talents.”

FORMS: Poetry

PRIZE(S): Each winner will receive $50 and a copy of the journal.

DUOTROPE: https://duotrope.com/listing/9939

Shuf

DEADLINE: 8/31/2015

SUBMISSION FEE: NONE

NOTES: “shufPoetry is a biannual online poetry journal that seeks work which challenges the very definition of poetry through experimentation, mixed media, genre bending, video, animation, sound, visual text and music.”

FORMS:  “Please submit three vaguely poemy thingys (audio, animation, video, oelipo, image, interview, cross-genre, screenplay, photography, art, twitter rants, cut-ups, textual repression, you name it), and give us a little explanation about what you just sent.”

PRIZE(S): In lieu of a contest each issue will have one featured poet chosen by our editors who will receive $100.

DUOTROPE: https://duotrope.com/listing/7766 (just re-opened, not defunct)

Switchback

DEADLINE: 8/31/2015

SUBMISSION FEE: NONE

NOTES: “Switchback is an online publication of the MFA in Writing Program at the University of San Francisco. We are a biannual journal because that’s about all we can handle. We generally open submissions for a few months at a time, then catch our breath while we put together the issue. Right now we’re accepting submissions for Switchback Issue 22, to be published in Fall 2015.”

FORMS:  Reviews, fiction, poetry, nonfiction, art

PRIZE(S): 1st – $200, 2nd – $75, 3rd – $50

DUOTROPE: https://duotrope.com/listing/2077

 

 


“Upon Poet-Tree”–a cento tribute poem to Verse-Virtual editor Firestone Feinberg

tlhopkinson:

So much excellent poetry and so many familiar names in the pages of Verse-Virtual online literary mag every month I had to re-post this found poem I composed from the editor’s own work. Enjoy!

Originally posted on Trish Hopkinson:

I composed the following tribute poem from whole lines found in the original poetry by Firestone Feinberg, exquisite poet and editor of Verse-Virtual.

If you enjoyed this post, please visit the pages of all the fine poets on Verse-Virtual. New issues are posted monthly and submissions are open year round.

Upon Poet-Tree

“A word is but a silhouette― / It says a part but not the whole― / And, too, a shadow― given name― / Denies description of a soul.” –F. Feinberg

Temporary—
the typewriter,
a few words
despite the sad stillness of the moment.
I’ll make a paper airplane—
exhausted by the weather,
the distance in the room,
and the silence of the watercolor sky.
Not dark nor drear, but luminous.
A day unlike another, this
old truth,
when talk is out of place . . .
make apology.
To make—that makes any sense.
You’re living or…

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My found poem “Jules Talks to Jules” published by Drunk Monkeys

So cool to have a found poem accepted for publication by Drunk Monkeys! My poem “Jules Talks to Jules” created from lines spoken only by the character Jules in Quentin Tarantino’s film Pulp Fiction was accepted along with two others, forthcoming in August.

p.s. If you aren’t a fan or haven’t seen the film, don’t be surprised by the colorful language that comes out of Jules’ mouth.

Drunk Monkeys is an online lit mag with a unique style, dedicated to “publishing work that’s as eclectic as possible, from some of the most exciting emerging voices in the literary scene.” You can read more on their about page, which is not to be missed! Click here for Drunk Monkeys submission guidelines.

If you like this post, please share with your writerly friends and/or follow my blog or like my Facebook page.

dm


TEN REASONS FOR SENDING YOUR POEMS TO MAGAZINES by Helena Nelson of Happenstance Press

Originally posted on Trish Hopkinson:

This article was a great reminder of why I spend so much time submitting my poetry and supporting poetry and writing in general. Number four on the list is my favorite:

“The poet who works at getting the poems out there is a member of the community of jobbing poets. It’s part of the apprenticeship, if you like. It’s an honourable striving. If the poems aren’t accepted, the effort is no less praiseworthy. Besides, you’re going to stick at it. You’re going to send them somewhere else. There are many publications for your messages in a bottle to float away to.”

Definitely check out Helena’s small UK press HappenStance. You can subscribe or purchase poetry pamphlets.

“The press mainly publishes first collections from UK poets (there are exceptions). We are based in Scotland and each year a couple of the publications are by Scottish or Scotland-based writers. Most of…

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List of Paying Lit Mags/Journals from Poetry Has Value

Poetry Has Value is a blog by professor and poet Jessica Piazza. The blog description reads:

“Recently, I was inspired by the poet Dena Rash Guzman’s personal challenge to send her poetry to paying markets in 2015. I was so inspired, in fact, that I decided to spend the next whole year submitting poetry ONLY to paying journals and markets, and recording what happens in this blog. I also decided to use this space to simultaneously explore deeper questions of poetry’s value and worth (monetary or otherwise.)”

There are several interesting posts from other authors on the site, including one from friend and fellow poet E. Kristin Anderson on her experience with a speculative fiction mag. The articles explore issues whether or not poetry is a commodity, why prose pays more, etc. Jessica has also added a great resource for all poets looking to submit to paying markets and has asked that her readership continue to add to a public Google doc list.

Make sure to support this project, add any paying markets you know of to the list, and follow Poetry Has Value for upcoming articles and experiences from authors.

Click here for the list: Journals That Pay For Poems

Click here for the article: Journals That Pay For Poems: A Resource

Click here to see my list and download the spreadsheet: Paying Markets for Emerging Poets

If you like this post, please share with your writerly friends and/or follow my blog or like my Facebook page.

phv


PAYING/NO FEE Submission Call – NonBinary Review, DEADLINE: Oct. 31, 2015

NonBinary Review pays 1 cent per word for fiction and nonfiction, and a flat fee of $10 per poem and $25 per piece of visual art

Their current themed issue submission call:

Issue #7: Wilkie Collins’ The Woman in White 

You can read the The The Woman in White here:  http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/583

DEADLINE: October 31, 2015

If you like this post, please share with your writerly friends and/or follow my blog or like my Facebook page.

nonbinary


Need a poetry fix or share your work with a world audience? World Poetry Open Mic is your cure . . .

tlhopkinson:

Share your work with a wide audience and listen in to poets live!

Originally posted on Trish Hopkinson:

Every Friday night at 8pm MT / 7pm PT tune in online to hear poetry or read your own. This show is in it’s third year and you can check out archive shows to see if it’s the poetry forum you’re looking for. (It appears they play music for about the first 30 minutes of the archived recordings, so you may need to skip ahead to the poetry show). The hosts are experienced and entertaining. Definitely worth a listen!

If you like this post, please share with your writerly friends and/or follow my blog or like my Facebook page.

wpm

If you’re going to read your work on the air, there are only a few basic rules:

1. Poems should be 1 to 3 minutes in length

2. No F-bombs

3. No hate speech

You can also follow WPOM on Facebook.

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