Guest Blog Posts

7 Popular Metal Songs That Are Based on Poems – guest blog post by Ronald Ross

How often do you read a poem and feel like it could have been a metal song? Well there are a few poems which became famous metal songs. Just imagine the creativity of the maker.

Changing a poem into a metal song is a difficult task to do. Adding heavy music and energy to a poem written in calmness. Although not all the songs are a complete adaptation, some are just an inspiration. Here are some of the popular metal songs that are based on poems.

1) Iron Maiden – Rime of The Ancient Mariner

A poem as old as around 200 years is nothing less than a masterpieceSamuel Taylor Coleridge’s creation is unforgettable and priceless. Iron maiden recreated the gem with such a perfection. The entire 14-minute performance is a compositional masterpiece, giving all due respect the poem deserves.

2) Celtic Frost – Sorrows of The Moon

The poem Tristesses De La Lune by Charles Baudelaire had many versions in different languages. The song composed by Celtic Frost is so calm and metallic at the same time. Reading the poem with the song is an experience one must have. You must understand poetry to get a complete understanding of the song. It is one of the finest songs by Celtic Frost.

3) Cathedral – A Funeral Request

A Funeral Request is an adaptation of the poem Requiem/Sombre Sonnet. The poem was written by David Park Barnitz and is one of his darkest creation. Cathedral finely used his nihilistic deterioration. You must listen to the song on the best speakers you can ever have as it is a wonderful creation.

4) Manowar – Achilles, Agony and Ecstasy In Eight Parts

The Iliad was an epic poem written by Homer in 750 BC. Manowar decided they only needed one side of vinyl to retell Homer’s ancient Greek Trojan War document. The poem is also adopted and made into a film named ‘Troy’. The lyrics of the song can imply that the writer made a careful and detailed study of Iliad. The super hit metal adaptation of the poem is extraordinary.

 5) Iced Earth – Dante’s Inferno

The Divine Comedy: Inferno a poem by Dante Alighieri is very well written into a song. It explains the epic journey of Virgil and the pilgrim through the nine circles of Hell from the dark. The 17-minute-long video will keep you engaged. The popularity of the song is so much that it is the most played song by Iced Earth.

6) Ulver – Voice of The Devil

The Marriage of heaven and hell by William Blake is biblical creation with his personal beliefs. Ulver’s ambient electro trip-hop made justice to the song. It is one of the best metal songs ever created. It is said that steel tongue drums were also used during the song which gave it a more metallic effect. You can know about it on steel tongue drum reviews by LoudBeats.org.

7) Song of Myself

Last but not the least. Tuomas Holopainen attempted perhaps the boldest and most complex poetic recreation. He penned his poem with the same title a Walt Whitman’s acclaimed American epic poem. The lyrics were subtle and celebratory. Song of myself is a masterpiece which is so brilliantly made, it sounds very energetic and seems to be a replica of the original piece. A die-hard metal fan should not miss this one for sure.

So, after reading about poems turned into metal songs it would make you more interested towards heavy metal. There is a long relation between metal and poems. The music, head banging, lyrics and the energy is beyond happiness. No wonder heavy metal is so popular all over the world.


Do you have something say about poetry? An essay on being a poet, tips for poets, or poetry you love? TrishHopkinson.com is now accepting pitches for guest blog posts. 

Contact me here if you are interested! 


About the Author:

Ronald Ross is fond of drums. His study on music and poems is exceptional. He shares his knowledge about music on his blog loudbeats.org.

You can find him at:

Loud Beats
4424 Charter Oaks Ave
Bakersfield, CA 93309
USA
Phone: 774-901-8408
http://loudbeats.org/

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